Sympathetic vasomotion monitoring

New device will improve outcomes in renal denervation procedures

  • Detects small changes in vasomotion
  • Can be used to determine if a renal denervation procedure was successful
  • Will increase the success rate of renal denervations
  • Can also be used as a screening tool for blood pressure-related fainting and non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring

 
Licensing manager: Matt Boehm, Ph.D., mboehm@unmc.edu or 402-559-2166.
 

Description

New device will improve outcomes in renal denervation procedures

Researchers at UNMC developed a device capable of making high blood pressure more treatable by accurately measuring the rhythmic constriction and relaxation of blood vessels, known as sympathetic vasomotion.
 

Co-inventor Peter Pellegrino presented the sympathetic vasomotion monitoring system for renal denervation during UNeMed’s 2017 Industry Partnering Summit earlier this year.

The sympathetic nervous system controls the body’s automated functions such as digestion, heart rate and the vasomotion of blood vessels. Disruption of the sympathetic nervous system can contribute to a variety of chronic diseases, including high blood pressure.
 
One potentially effective way to treat high blood pressure is to destroy, or ablate, all or parts of the sympathetic nerves of the kidneys. The problem, however, is until now there has not been an accurate tool that helps clinicians in real-time determine if the procedure is targeting the proper areas of the kidneys.
 
UNMC’s detection system non-invasively monitors sympathetic nerve activity in real time and determines if a renal denervation procedure was successful. This technology will help significantly increase the success rate of renal denervation procedures.
 
UNMC researchers have shown that the sympathetic vasomotion detection system can accurately detect renal denervation in rat and rabbit models. A current study in pigs is expected to further validate the system’s ability and accuracy.
 
The sympathetic vasomotion detection system is a versatile tool that can also monitor and detect other diseases or conditions associated with the sympathetic nervous system.
 
In addition to their work with renal denervation, UNMC researchers are also investigating the device’s use as a screening tool for blood pressure-related fainting and non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring.
 
To discuss licensing opportunities please contact Matt Boehm, Ph.D., at mboehm@unmc.edu or 402-559-2166.